Australian Art-Painting

In the 1930s, two landscape painters from Britain first became professional painters in Australia. One was J. Glover, who settled with his family in 1831. His Large Abstract Wall Art are mainly idyllic, fresh and innovative in spirit to promote Australian artists to modern society. Another painter, C. Martens, arrived in Sydney in 1835 and became one of the best and most productive painters of the time. He is an admirer of J.M.W. Tyner, who depicts the sunshine and atmosphere in Australian scenery with a romantic temperament. S.T. Gail’s popular lithography records the rich and colorful life of gold-diggers. Cartoons also developed, and the Sydney Bulletin became the home of some famous cartoonists in the late 19th century. However, it is the oil painter who embodies the Australian national character most fully in the visual arts, and the influence of the pre-Raphaelists appeared in the 1970s.

Around 1900, painters who made great contributions to the establishment of the Australian School of Extra Large Abstract Painting often went abroad, mainly to London and Paris. When they returned home, they became the driving force for the production of modern art. Influenced by the New Art Movement, the decorative art at home has formed the characteristics of decorative patterns combining local animals and plants. In the 1950s, a more general trend was Custom Abstract Wall Art, which mainly influenced modern painters who returned home after studying in Europe and held an exhibition of French contemporary art in Australia in 1953. By the 1960s, Australian avant-garde Black and White Abstract Painting began to harmonize with American trends. Artists returning from visits to the United States have contributed to this tendency. Abstract painting mainly shows three types: hard edge art, visual art and gamut.